COURSE INFORMATION

​Course Number ​Title ​GE
ENGL039 Writer's Club
Students meet regularly to write, discuss, and workshop personal and creative writing; attend and promote literary events; and share in a community of those who are engaged with the written and spoken word.
ENGL048 The Pulse Activity
Students participate in producing the student newspaper. They choose from assignments in reporting, editing, photography, advertising, and production.
ENGL104 College Writing I: Intro to Academic Writing
Prerequisite: reading competency (ACT reading score of 23 or higher on the most recent test results; SAT verbal score of 540 or higher on the most recent test results) or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 145 This course emphasizes writing processes appropriate for narrative and expository essays. The course helps students to express their own ideas in lively prose that conforms to conventional standards of style and usage. Some of the writing assignments will require responses to assigned readings, but the focus throughout most of the course remains on each student's expression of his/her own ideas. Students are placed into this course by the English faculty. Grades assigned for this course include the 12-point grading scale and the additions of an "NC" and "P" grades. "NC" stands for no credit and doesn't affect the GPA. "P" stands for passing and is only given to qualifying non-native speakers.
ENGL105 College Writing I Tutorial:Intro to Academic Writing
Prerequisite: an "NC" grade in ENGL 104 or placement by the English faculty. An alternative version of ENGL 104, this course is designed for students who need intensive instruction in order to satisfy the requirements of ENGL 104. ENGL 105 may be taken for credit only if the student has not received credit for ENGL 104. Grades assigned for this course include the 12-point grading scale and the additions of an "NC" and "P" grades. "NC" stands for no credit and doesn't affect the GPA. "P" stands for passing and is only given to qualifying non-native speakers.
ENGL106 College Writing II: Academic Writing and Research
Prerequisite: ENGL 104 or ENGL 105 or placement by the English faculty. This course introduces students to writing processes and prose conventions common to many academic disciplines, and it provides opportunities for students to participate in one or more of the ongoing conversations in particular communities of writers. The course emphasizes analytic and persuasive writing based on critical reading of nonfiction prose. At least one system of formal documentation is covered. Grades assigned for this course include the 12-point grading scale and the additions of an "NC" and "P" grades. "NC" stands for no credit and doesn't affect the GPA. "P" stands for passing and is only given to qualifying non-native speakers.
ENGL107 College Writing II Tutorial: Academic Writing and Research
Prerequisite: "NC" in ENGL 106 or placement by the English faculty An alternative version of ENGL 106, this course is designed for students who need intensive instruction in order to satisfy the requirements of ENGL 106. ENGL 107 may be taken for credit only if the student has not received credit for ENGL 106. Grades assigned for this course include the 12-point grading scale and the additions of an "NC" and "P" grades. "NC" stands for no credit and doesn't affect the GPA. "P" stands for passing and is only given to qualifying non-native speakers.
ENGL130 Experiences in English
This is an active, experience-oriented course in which students can work with writing, language, or literature in such areas as campus publications, journalism, advertising, public relations, teaching, and librarianship. This course is repeatable up to four semester hours.
ENGL145 College and Professional Reading
This course is designed to help students develop vocabulary and comprehension skills appropriate for university-and professional- level reading.
ENGL150 Literature Appreciation Y
Prerequisite: freshman standing or permission of the instructor. This is an introductory course which, by focusing on the themes and values of selected works, builds student awareness and appreciation of the nature of literature and the way it "speaks" to life's issues. Designed for first-year college students, the course will stress discussion and the development of personal responses to literature.
ENGL200 Introduction to English Studies
This cornerstone course acquaints students with topics in English studies; it introduces basic bibliographic and research methods in literature, language, rhetoric, and composition; and it explains career and graduate school opportunities to English majors.
ENGL202 Writing and Literature
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. Writing and Literature introduces students to a variety of writing and reading assignments on a topic of general interest. Each section of Writing and Literature will include a subtitle that indicates the topical focus of the section. All sections will involve the application of critical and analytical thinking to a variety of reading and writing assignments, and students will extend their experience in critical reading and in writing with sources.
ENGL206 College Writing II Advanced: Academic Writing and Research
Prerequisite: placement by the English faculty An advanced version of ENGL 106, this course introduces students to writing processes and prose conventions common to many academic disciplines, and it provides opportunities for students to participate in several ongoing conversations in particular communities of writers. The course emphasizes analytic and persuasive writing based on critical reading of nonfiction prose. In addition, ENGL 206 specifically emphasizes effective research methods and use of library databases. At least one system of formal documentation is covered. Grades assigned for this course include the 12-point grading scale and the additions of an "NC" and "P" grades. "NC" stands for no credit and doesn't affect the GPA. "P" stands for passing and is only given to qualifying non-native speakers.
ENGL208 Creative Writing Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 or permission of the English faculty. This is a course in which students expand the range of their writing ability through workshops, written work, readings, exercises, and discussions focused on a particular literary genre, including, but not limited to, creative non-fiction, fiction, and poetry. This course may be taken three times, provided the topics are different.
ENGL210 Introduction to Style
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 This course will serve as an introduction to theories of style, and it will also provide students with practice in analyzing rhetorical situations for the purpose of determining and then executing an appropriate style. Theoretical topics will include the problem of defining style, the relationships between style and rhetorical situation, the problem of defining discourse community, the relationship between style and persuasion, the problems relating to style and bias, and the ethical problems associated with style. Practical issues will include diction, technical terms and jargon, tone, sentence combining, emphasis, rhythm, sentence variety, sentence elegance in technical prose, sentence faults, writing on one topic, developing the paragraph topic, achieving an effective flow, and providing adequate details.
ENGL235 Topics in Literature Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, 206, or permission of the instructor. This course in the study of literature emphasizes genres found in literature: short story, novel, drama, poetry. Students will learn the basics of each genre by analyzing theme-based works on topics such as science fiction, women's literature, minority literature, literature on film, detective fiction, and so on. Although one genre may be emphasized, discussion will be given to other genres. This course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
ENGL260 Public Relations Writing
Prerequisite: ENGL 270 or permission of the instructor. This course examines how public relations practitioners think, plan, and write within their profession. Students will learn to write news releases, basic feature stories, case study analyses, and other public relations-oriented materials.
ENGL265 Feature Writing
Prerequisite: ENGL 270 or permission of the instructor. This course begins with the basics and moves through increasingly advanced forms of feature writing for newspapers and magazines. Students will learn to generate feature story ideas, research the ideas through a variety of methods, conduct in-depth interviews, and write feature stories for a variety of audiences. Students will also learn about the process of marketing stories for freelance writing.
ENGL270 Newswriting
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course teaches students how journalists think, gather information, and write for newspapers on daily deadlines. Students practice journalistic skills, which include covering news events, conducting interviews, and writing news stories.
ENGL270L Newswriting Lab
Co-requisite: ENGL 270 Students will practice journalistic skills learned in ENGL 270 by researching, interviewing sources, and writing basic news stories that are targeted at the University audience. Types of assignments will parallel topics being covered in ENGL 270 throughout the semester. Students will work with the instructor to establish story angles, interview preparation, writing methods, and deadlines. Students will spend a minimum of 50 hours working as a reporter for The Pulse.
ENGL271 Non-Print Media Writing
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. Techniques and practical exercises in covering news stories and writing and editing for radio and other non-print mass media are included in this course. The course will utilize microcomputer word processing.
ENGL272 Intro to Technical Communication
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 This course emphasizes the design of clear and concise written, oral, and electronic communication to meet the needs of particular audiences. Students will create documents associated with fields of professional and personal interest. Some sample assignments may include the following: proposals, progress reports, completion reports, instructions, descriptions, brochures, articles, and product and service information. Design concepts that integrate both text and graphics will be applied to documents and presentations. The course will also focus on conducting research in technical communication, usability testing, and the application of a variety of documentation styles.
ENGL282 Intro to Writing for Sciences
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course emphasizes writing for the general public, scientists, and industry. Introduction to Writing for the Sciences teaches students how to translate difficult scientific concepts into concise, readable documents. Students learn how to become effective writers through practice writing assignments including but not limited to abstracts, research proposals, progress reports, and ethnographies. Students are introduced to the process of effective interpretation and analysis of complex scientific information for a non-scientific audience and will be mentored to help develop their writing style for their intended audience.
ENGL300 The English Language
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 202. This course emphasizes the history of the English language and its continuing development. The class also emphasizes the study of English grammar as well as various linguistic fields, including the but not limited to phonetics, morphology, semantics, and pragmatics.
ENGL301 Proj Mgmt & Adv Topics in Tech Communication
Prerequisite: ENGL 272, 282, or permission of the instructor. This advanced writing course provides the opportunity for students to manage and complete one or more special projects in the area of technical communication. Examples of special projects include brochures, manuals, websites, reports, proposals, and instructions. Topics for study and practice include strategies for effectively managing and producing publications, analysis of rhetorical situations, persuasion, and document design.
ENGL302 Advanced Writing
Prerequisite(s): "B" or better in ENGL 106, 107, or 206 or "C" or better in ENGL 202, 272, 282, 305, or 306. This is a course in which students with basically solid writing ability can increase the sophistication and effectiveness of their writing beyond conventional essay forms through analysis, revision, and practice. Special attention is given in this course to analytical writing as well as to preparation for graduate-level writing and research.
ENGL303 Technical Editing
Prerequisite: ENGL 272, 282, or permission of the instructor. Technical editing is a professional activity that allows students to analyze the ways editors work and to learn how information is evaluated before professional publications or distribution. The levels and types of editing, principles of hardcopy and softcopy editing, and methods of working with writers, editors, copy editors, and proofreaders to produce usable technical and scientific information are emphasized. Students work with samples of computer-based and printed information but also edit materials for professional writers.
ENGL305 E-Rhetoric and Writing
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course introduces writing strategies for effective communication within digital environments with an emphasis on non-literary spaces. Students will write about and analyze multimodal digital texts created for the Web including websites, videos, podcasts, wikis, blogs, and/or social networking outlets. Effective rhetorical principles such as the role of the ethos in digital communications, invention strategies for multimodal writing, and arrangement and style of multimodal texts will be emphasized.
ENGL306 E-Literature and Writing
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course examines how electronic media are reshaping literature. Students will survey important concepts in poetics, and they will consider how these concepts can be applied to literature online. Reading and writing assignments will acquaint students with established and emerging genres of literature, processes for composing and publishing electronic texts, and literary resources on the Internet.
ENGL307 Critical Perspective of Nature, Technology, Society & Culture
Prerequisite: ENGL 202, 272, 282, 302, 305, or 306 This course will examine the relationship between nature and technology from both historical and contemporary perspectives. The impact of technology on nature, society, and culture will also be examined. Students will read, discuss, and critique representative examples of fiction and non-fiction literature with nature and technology themes. Students will also apply critical and analytical thinking skills to predict the social, environmental, and cultural impact of technology as well as practical responses to technology in the workplace.
ENGL308 Advanced Creative Writing
Prerequisite: ENGL 208. This course builds on the work of ENGL 208 through advanced workshop, readings, and discussions to help students increase the range and sophistication of their fiction/creative non-fiction or poetry.
ENGL309 International Technical Comm.
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 272, 301, or permission of the instructor Students will explore the cultural and ethical dimensions of technical communication, including issues such as creating and maintaining effective cross-cultural collaborative teams, conflicting values in international settings, writing across cultures, and designing information, composing visuals, explaining technical concepts, and incorporating effective persuasive strategies for international audiences. Students will also put theory into practice by designing information appropriate and effective for an international community.
ENGL310 Principles of Linguistics Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course offers an introduction to the basic principles of language structure, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Also explored are the physiological, psychological, and social aspects of language acquisition, production, and comprehension. Examples and exercises are taken from a variety of languages, but knowledge of languages other than English is not required.
ENGL314 Visual Rhetoric
Prerequisite: ENGL 272, 282, or permission of the instructor Visual rhetoric refers to conveying information through visual aspects of communication rather than through its verbal aspects. Visual rhetoric encompasses document design, the use of graphics, and visual depictions of data. In other words, visual rhetoric explores ways of making documents more effective for their audience, purpose, and content through designing text and incorporating visual elements.
ENGL318 Readings in Rhetoric
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, 206, or permission of the instructor This is a variable-topic course in which students study and write about significant issues related to the rhetoric of written texts. The course is intended for intellectually lively students, such as prospective teachers, majors in writing, communication, and political science, and others interested in learning more about the nature of writing and the "power" of texts. Specifically, the course will explore how written texts persuade and act upon readers and how writers go about producing such texts. Possible topics include invention, style, audience, argument, classical rhetoric, rhetoric of science, etc. This course is recommended as an upper-level general education course for juniors and seniors. The course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
ENGL320 Social Dimensions of Language Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, 206, or permission of the instructor This is a variable-topic course that explores how topics and issues surrounding language, literature, and literacy influence the worlds in which people live. Possible topics include censorship, canon formation, the ebonics debate, high literature vs. popular literature, illiteracy, the uses and abuses of Standard English, etc. The course is also recommended as an upper-level general education course for juniors and seniors. The course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
ENGL321 Instructions and Manuals: Design and Usability
Prerequisite: ENGL 272, 282, or permission of the instructor Students will learn how to design and usability-test effective online and hardcopy instructions and manuals. The course will focus on the following topics: situational analysis, audience analysis, structure, style, design for selective reading, and graphics. Students will also learn how to design and implement usability tests for instructions and manuals.
ENGL324 Twentieth-Century Literature Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course covers representative modern and contemporary works of British, American, and world literature. Designed for the intellectually lively student, regardless of major, the course will focus on exciting works, trends, and ideas. It is especially recommended as an elective for juniors and seniors. The course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
ENGL325 Major Authors
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course involves a study of representative works by one author or group of authors who have made an important contribution to British, American, or world literature. The course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
ENGL330 Shakespeare
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course focuses on representative comedies, histories, tragedies, tragicomedies, and sonnets written by William Shakespeare. The course will emphasize Shakespeare's literary and dramatic technique as well as the historical and cultural context of the literature.
ENGL331 Maj Works of World Lit - Early Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course offers a sampling of important works from classical civilizations. It emphasizes universal human concerns and distinctive ideas and qualities in different cultures of the past. The course is intended for any interested student and is especially recommended as an elective for juniors and seniors.
ENGL332 Maj Works of World Lit - Late Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course covers important works of world literature from the late 17th century through the 19th century. It is intended for any interested student and is especially recommended as an elective for juniors and seniors.
ENGL333 Maj Works of World Lit - Global Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course offers a sampling of important works of global literature. It may include literature from India, Japan, China, the Islamic countries, Africa, Central America, and/or South America. It introduces the ideas and qualities of these different cultures and compares and contrasts them to Western cultures. The course is intended for any interested student and is especially recommended as an elective for juniors and seniors.
ENGL335 Maj Works of Brit Lit - Old Engl Texts to the 18th Century Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course focuses on major authors and works from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. It will also emphasize the literary traditions and cultural context of the works studied.
ENGL336 Maj Works of Brit Lit- Romantic & Victorian Poetry and Prose Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course focuses on the poetry and prose of 19th century Britain. While the primary emphasis of the course is poetry, prose works may also be considered, supplementing the discussion of the poetry. Attention will be given to the definitions of "Romantic" and "Victorian," to the culture of these periods, and to male and female writers of both the Romantic and Victorian periods.
ENGL337 Maj Works of British Literature - The English Novel Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course examines the English novel and places it within cultural contexts. Although works and authors studied will vary, the course will explore the rise of the English novel, will consider different categories within the genre, and will usually include both male and female novelists.
ENGL338 Maj Works of American Literature Beginning to 1865 Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course focuses on the early stages of American literature, when people were working to create a literature that was distinctly American. Topics include the literature of colonization, the Puritans, the Romantics, the Transcendentalists, and the Civil War, and literature's role in the early formative years of America.
ENGL339 Maj Works of American Literature 1865 to 1945 Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course focuses on the literature written in America during the establishing and evolving of modern America. Topics include the Realists, Naturalists, Regionalism, and the beginning Modernists. The role of literature in society from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century will also be expected.
ENGL340 Maj Works of American Literature 1945 to present Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course focuses on post-World War II American literature, including both the mid- to late-20th and early-21st century. Topics include the Modernists, Post Modernists, Confessional, Regional Deep Image, Metafiction, feminism and diversity, along with the myriad other trends and schools. The role of literature in society from the mid-20th to early-21st century will also be explored.
ENGL341 Young Adult Literature
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. The course is designed to fulfill one of the requirements for teacher licensure. Students are given an introduction to contemporary young adult literature appropriate for middle-grade and secondary-level classrooms. Strategies for developing both reading interest and comprehension skills are included.
ENGL345 Process & Teaching of Writing
Prerequisite: "B" or better in ENGL 106, 107, or 206 or "C" or better in ENGL 202, 272, 282, 302, 305, or 306. This is an advanced writing course in which students study and write about writing processes, rhetoric, and the teaching of writing. The course is intended for intellectually lively students, such as prospective teachers, majors in writing and communication, and others interested in the complex processes of writing.
ENGL350 Literary Criticism and Theory
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 This course offers an examination of the theoretical basis of contemporary approaches to literature and the application of these approaches to selected works.
ENGL360 News Editing
Prerequisite: ENGL 270. This course focuses on editing news and feature stories for accuracy, clarity, and completeness. Students will learn how to identify and correct weaknesses in journalistic writing. Students will use a professional news style in editing wire copy and locally produced copy. This course will also explore the managerial roles of editors.
ENGL360L News Editing Lab
Co-requisite: ENGL 360 Students will use editing skills, newsroom management theory, and design principles learned in ENGL 306 to work on the editorial staff of a campus medium (either The Pulse, UF-TV, or WLFC, depending on campus media needs and the professional interests of the students). Students will spend a minimum of 50 hours in editing lab time.
ENGL370 Advanced Newspractice
Prerequisites: ENGL 270, demonstrated word processing ability. This course builds on the basic skills taught in the introductory newswriting course. Students will learn to prepare professional journalistic articles, including opinion columns, in-depth features, spot news, and investigative articles.
ENGL370L Advanced Newspractice Lab
Co-requisite: ENGL 370 Students will choose a news beat in ENGL 370 in which to focus their journalistic stories. While ENGL 370 requires four types of stories for the ending portfolio, the lab will allow students to choose additional types of advanced journalistic writing within their established news beats to produce additional in-depth pieces (established through discussions with the instructor and campus media leaders) for campus media (either The Pulse, UF-TV, or WLFC, depending on campus media needs and the professional interests of the students). Students will spend a minimum of 50 hours working as a journalist for the campus media.
ENGL415 Advanced Web Design: Online Help and Usability Testing
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 272 or 282 and ENGL 321 or permission of the instructor This course will teach students how to create online help and design usability tests to determine the effectiveness of that help. Students will also learn industry standard software for creating online help, and theories of effective online information design.
ENGL480 Practicum/Field Work in English
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206, permission of the English faculty. This course involves a supervised project involving on-the-job or off-campus experience in such areas as writing, public relations, or education. This course is repeatable up to 12 semester hours.
ENGL490 Advanced Studies in English
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206, permission of English Chair. This is an advanced course that may focus on literature, literary theory, writing, linguistics, teaching, or tutoring. This course is repeatable up to six semester hours.
ENGL491 Independent Study
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206, permission of the English faculty. This course is a program of guided independent study in literature, literary theory, linguistics, writing, or teaching. The course is repeatable up to 10 hours, provided the topics are different.
ENGL492 Capstone Seminar in English
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206, junior or senior standing, permission of the English faculty This course is designed to be a capstone experience for English majors who are in either their junior or senior years. Students will be asked to narrow the focus of their studies to an area of interest that they have developed during their previous course work and/or through their experience in the field. Students will then complete a project related to this area of interest; the project might be a substantial research paper, a creative project, or some other endeavor befitting a culminating university experience. All projects will be conceived and executed with the guidance of the course instructor.
ENGL495 Technical Comm Internship
Prerequisites: ENGL 210, 272, 301, 314, 321, 415; cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the end of the preceding semester; 3.0 GPA in all major requirements completed prior to the internship; minimum of 30 semester hours from The University of Findlay This course offers supervised work-and-learning experience in technical communication under the direction of a faculty member of the Department of English and an employee of a participating firm. Ten to 40 hours a week of student time are expected during the internship. Students may be compensated for their internship at the discretion of the employing firm. Students are encouraged to complete their internships during the summer semester, but they may also do so during the fall and spring semesters. Enrollment is contingent upon availability of internships. Students are selected on the basis of personal qualifications, including GPA, courses taken, recommendations, and an interview. This course will be graded S/U and may be repeated with a maximum of 15 semester hours applying toward a degree.