COURSE INFORMATION

​Course Number ​Title ​GE
HIST101 Introduction to History Y
This course offers an introduction to historical methodologies, historiography ("the history of history"), and the various branches (i.e., political, intellectual, social, etc.) of history.
HIST110 History of the U.S. to 1865 Y
This general survey course traces the international multicultural roots of American society, economics, religion, and politics from pre-colonization through the Civil War with a balanced emphasis upon both national development and sub-cultural complexity.
HIST111 History of U.S. Since 1865 Y
This general survey course traces the modernization and growth of the American nation from the Civil War through the 20th century highlighting its political, international, social, multicultural, religious, economic, and technological transformations, development, and diversity.
HIST120 Selected Themes in Hist. of Civ. Y
An introductory-level course that serves majors and non-majors, this course covers themes that have a basis in the past, speak to current concerns, and cover Western and non-Western countries. Themes have included revolution, the novel and history, war, sexuality, and marriage. May be repeated when theme changes. HIST 120 may be counted as upper-level credit when taken as HIST 320. Further requirements will be added for the upper-level option.
HIST150 Ascent of Civ. to 476 A.D. Y
A comparative study of ancient cultures, this course focuses on the rise of civilization in the ancient Middle East. It concludes with an examination of civilization in the Mediterranean basin including classical Greece and Rome.
HIST151 Global History,c.500BC to 1780AD Y
This course involves a general survey of the social, economic, and political interactions of major societies to the eve of the Industrial Revolution and the onset of the colonial era.
HIST152 Global History, 1780 to Present Y
This course offers a general survey of the social, political, and economic interactions among major societies in the modern era, with special attention to colonialism and imperialism, revolutions and anti-colonial struggles, and the forging of what is frequently described as an increasingly global economy and culture.
HIST220 European Civ From 476-1648 Y
This course provides a survey of European civilization from the fall of Rome to the Treaty of Westphalia with emphasis on the social and political history of Europe, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the period of religious wars.
HIST221 European Civ Since 1648 Y
This course offers a survey of European social and political history focusing on the rise of the European state system, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the congress system, the First World War, communism, fascism, the Second World War, and the nuclear age.
HIST242 World War II Y
This course will focus on the causes and consequences of one of the most monumental historical events of all time. The social, political, military, and moral dimensions of the war will be examined from the perspectives of the soldiers, civilians, and statesmen confronting the experience of total war. By the end of the course, students should obtain a solid understanding of what it means to think historically through collective reflection on a variety of primary and secondary source materials pertaining to WWII. The course will end by considering to what degree today's world is still shaped by the legacy of what some have termed the "last good war."
HIST248 Film and History Y
This class will offer an overview of the often-contentious relationship between film and history. We will ask to what extent films constitute historical evidence, reflect and influence ideological agendas, and offer distinct and persuasive interpretations of the past. Students should develop a mastery of visual literacy skills that will allow them to reflect critically upon films rather than passively "consuming" them.
HIST260 The Hist of Women in America Y
This course will explore the many ways that women participated in, and contributed to, the creation of our nation and its continued dynamism. How women managed to shape the nation's institutions, culture, government, society, and economy--although for centuries they lacked civil rights and freedoms--will be an important consideration in this class. The evolutions and revolutions in women's status and opportunities will be explored in relation to the economic, legal, political, and social factors that served as barriers or boosts in the quest for full civil rights and equal opportunity.
HIST302 Studies in Non-Western World Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is designed to increase awareness of the international significance of the culture and politics of selected areas. Areas will change from time to time and will emphasize topics such as Japan, China, Africa, or the Middle East. Special attention will be given to Western relations within an area and its contemporary aspirations and problems. The course may be repeated, if topic is different.
HIST315 Environmental History Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course provides an examination of the historical interaction between people and environment in Europe and North America. This course will begin with history and end with law, as it is now law on a national and international level that dominates public action vis-a-vis the environment.
HIST320 Selected Themes in Hist. of Civ. Y
An introductory-level course that serves majors and non-majors, this course covers themes that have a basis in the past, speak to current concerns, and cover Western and non-Western countries. Themes have included revolution, the novel and history, war, sexuality and marriage. May be repeated when theme changes. HIST 120 may be counted as upper-level credit when taken HIST 320. Further requirements will be added for the upper-level option.
HIST325 History of the Supreme Court Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course will examine the evolution of law in America from the colonial period to the present. The course is intended to illuminate American history from the perspective of our legal culture, and to expose students interested in a career in the legal world to the field's rich background material.
HIST328 Community-Urban Field Exper.
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206, approval of the Community-Urban Field Experiences director, minimum 2.75 GPA, and have earned a minimum of 30 semester hours at The University of Findlay. This course offers guided work-study experiences. While most opportunities are available in Findlay and Hancock County, many off-campus learning experiences are also provided throughout Ohio and other parts of the United States. This course will be graded S/U and may be repeated with a maximum of 15 semester hours applying toward a degree.
HIST331 American Foreign Policy Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course involves an interpretive study of American foreign policy from the American Revolution to the present with emphasis on the 20th century. The course may be elected to fulfill the requirements for a political science major.
HIST335 The American Civil War Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. The Civil War is frequently considered the watershed event in American history. The course looks at the reasons for the war, the war itself, and the Reconstruction period following.
HIST350 European Society and Thought Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. Focus is on the non-political dimensions of European life. Attention will be given to social life, the family, women, religion, and some aspects of intellectual thought since about 1700.
HIST352 Selected Topics in Global Hist. Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is designed to meet current interests by examining selected topics in global history. Topics may include: war and social change; science and technology in the Western world; imperialism, colonialism, post-colonialism; the Cold War; genocide; or slavery. The course may be repeated, if topic is different.
HIST375 Sel. Topics in American History Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is designed to meet current interests by examining selected topics in American history. Topics have included: urban history, religious history, frontier history, the Civil War, economic history, and African-American history and culture. The course may be repeated, if topic is different.
HIST382 American Society and Thought Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. The focus of this course is on the non-political dimensions of American life. Different periods from the colonial era to the present will be considered, with emphasis on the period since the Civil War.
HIST385 Sel. Topics in Asian History Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is designed to meet current interests by examining selected topics in Asian history. Topics may include: popular culture in East Asia; the Vietnam War; the Age of the Samurai; Imperial China; the Asian-American experience; colonialism and revolution in Southeast Asia. The course may be repeated, if topic is different.
HIST390 History of Ohio Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course covers the history of the state from the time of prehistoric Native Americans to the present. Consideration is given to geographical factors and Ohio's place in national development.
HIST400 Selected Topics in European Hist Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is designed to meet current interests by examining selected topics in European history. Topics may include: Russia, Soviet Union, England, or Germany. The course may be repeated, if topic is different.
HIST495 Independent Research in History
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 and permission of the instructor This course offers an opportunity for the advanced student to do independent research, or to become involved with class teaching, a specific group topic, or workshop activities. This course may be repeated, if topic is different.
HIST496 Senior Seminar
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 106, 107, or 206, senior major in history or comprehensive social science, or permission of the instructor. This is a capstone course for history and comprehensive social science majors. Preparation of a substantial research paper examining an issue of historical merit, and reflecting a grasp of historical methodology will be required. American, European, and East Asian subjects will be examined from time to time, as the need arises.