COURSE INFORMATION

​Course Number ​Title ​GE
PHIL100 Introduction to Philosophy Y
This course offers a survey of important philosophical problems relevant to human life in an age of rapid social and intellectual change, including the ultimate nature of reality, belief in God, personal identity, freedom and responsibility, the search for meaning in life, theories of knowledge, and ethical considerations of right and wrong.
PHIL101 Intro. to Critical Thinking Y
This course provides an introduction to the principles and methods of critical thinking and the distinctions between opinion, knowledge, and belief. It includes techniques of conceptual analysis as well as some introduction to informal fallacies of reasoning.
PHIL210 Philosophy of Religion Y
This course offers critical reflection on the nature and origin of religion, the relationship between faith and reason, and the character of religious language. Attention will be given to questions concerning the existence of God, good and evil, life after death, and claims of religious knowledge.
PHIL220 Ethical Issues of Modern World Y
This course provides an introduction to moral philosophy and its application to contemporary ethical issues. At various times the course may focus on special topics. The course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
PHIL221 Health Care Ethics Y
This course is designed to familiarize students with the kinds of ethical situations and questions they can expect to encounter as health care professionals, and to provide students with skills and information to enable them to make competent ethical decisions in clinical situations. Topics will include practitioner-patient relationships, treatment and informed consent, confidentiality, end-of-life choices, intraprofessional and interprofessional conflicts, and business concerns and conflicts. Intended primarily for students pursuing careers in health care and related fields, the course is open to all who are interested in the subject.
PHIL224 Ethics and Technology Y
This course is designed to familiarize students with the kinds of ethical situations and questions they can expect to encounter as professionals in the field of technology management, and to provide students skills and information to enable them to make competent ethical decisions in real-life situations. Topics will include information stewardship and privacy concerns, intellectual property issues, computer security, liability and safety responsibilities, professional codes of ethics, the social impact of computer technology, and related business concerns and conflicts.
PHIL226 Business Ethics Y
This course provides a critical study of fundamental ethical issues in a business context. Topics include application of moral theory to real-life situations in business practice, policy, and relationships with a focus upon principles for making moral decisions. Discussion topics may include justice and economic distribution, moral considerations of capitalism, corporate responsibility, ethics in the workplace, affirmative action, advertising, responsibility to consumers, protection of the environment, and other related ethical concerns.
PHIL230 Sports Ethics Y
This course is designed to create awareness of important ethical issues in sports and to provide students with skills and information to enable them to competently respond to such issues as they occur. Building upon their own experiences with sports, students will explore real-life issues from a variety of perspectives (e.g., as coach, player, parent, umpire, citizen). Possible topics will include the role of ethics in athletic competition, the value of sportsmanship, fairness in sports, use of performance-enhancing drugs, gamesmanship, violence, the role of a coach as an authority figure, friend, and counselor, and whether sports build moral character. Intended especially for student- athletes, the course is open to all who are interested in the topic.
PHIL235 Environmental/Animal Ethics Y
This course provides a historic and contemporary overview of Western and non-Western ethical thought concerning the environment and the humane treatment of animals. Students will be encouraged to critically examine their own beliefs, attitudes, and habits relative to the subject matter. Possible topics include saving endangered species, preserving the wilderness, controlling pollution, managing limited natural resources, raising animals for food, and using animals in experiments, as well as issues involving the moral status of animals, obligations to future generations, and global justice.
PHIL240 Media Ethics Y
This course offers a critical study of ethical issues in the field of communication and media, including print and non-print journalism, radio and television broadcasting, advertising, and to a lesser extent entertainment media such as movies and television programming. Possible topics will include the role of media in a free society, social and ethical responsibilities of media professionals, professional code of ethics, conflicts of interest, truthfulness and deception, privacy versus the public's right to know, when does "news judgment" become censorship, journalism ethics in the online age, what's fair in advertising and public relations, ethics and interviewing, and ethical dimensions of entertainment.
PHIL270 Existentialism Y
This course involves a survey of existentialist philosophy, including study of its influence and expression in literature, the fine arts, psychology, and religion. This course includes reflection upon basic existential themes such as the meaning of human existence, freedom and responsibility, the limits of reason, the significance of death, the individual versus society, and the implications of truth as subjectivity. Students will be challenged to consider how they define the world and to what extent they have the power to change the world. Readings from Kierkgaard, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, Buber, Simone deBeauvoir, or others are used within this course.
PHIL301 Logic and Language Y
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 or permission of the instructor, ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course acquaints students with the principles and methods of formal logic and its application to scientific reasoning, legal reasoning, and creative problem solving. It may also include an introduction to important issues in 20th-century philosophy of language.
PHIL304 Metaphysics and Epistemology
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 This course is an inquiry into the fundamental nature of reality and to the general question of what can and cannot be known. Historical figures to be introduced include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Topics to be considered will include appearance/ reality distinction(s), mind/body problem, the distinction between opinion, belief, and knowledge, epistemological skepticism, the nature of space and time, and the very meaning of Being.
PHIL305 From Thales to Richard Rorty
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206; PHIL 100 This course is an overview of Western Philosophy in its epistemology, beginning with a correspondence theory of truth where our ideas mirror the external world to the semantic and pragmatic theories of truth where our ideas make different types of sense of the world in order to better serve our current practical interests. The overall narrative of this course is in its seminal figures and issues, from Thales to Richard Rorty. Students will explore the discipline of philosophy from its origins, and consider pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Platonist and Aristotelian Medieval philsophers, Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz), Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley, Hume), Kant, Hegel, then the movements of Continental Philosophy and Analytical Philosophy, American pragmatism, and ending with postmodernism. The goal of this course is to help students tell the story of philosophy so as to understand the pressing philosophical problems today.
PHIL325 Beauty and Value Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is an inquiry into the nature of art and beauty, including problems of objectivity versus subjectivity. What does it mean to call something a "work of art?" Is beauty simply in the eye of the beholder? It provides an application of philosophical ideas and theories to present-day experiences and ongoing debates in contemporary aesthetics, such as colorization in movies. This course is intended for students with some background in either philosophy or the fine arts.
PHIL333 Social and Political Thought Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course provides a critical survey of salient social and political ideas in ancient, medieval, and contemporary philosophy. Although Western thought is given prominence, perspectives from non-Western cultures may be introduced to offer insightful comparisons or contrasts. Topics include issues of liberty, equality, economic justice, law, authority, citizenship, and civil disobedience.
PHIL380 Phil of Law: Jurisprudence Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206 This course offers a critical introduction to philosophy of law. Students will explore the views of diverse and influential thinkers from Plato to the present on the nature of law, associated problems, and types of solutions that have been proposed. The primary objective will be to better understand the function of law in human society. Topics will include the source of the authority of law, different types of law, the concept of legal responsibility, the relationship between morality and law, as well as related subjects such as legal reasoning, legal rights, and theories of punishment.
PHIL490 Topics in Philosophy Y
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This is an advanced course that, in different years, may focus on special problems or particular philosophers. The course may be taken twice, provided the topics are different.
PHIL491 Independent Study in Philosophy
Prerequisite: ENGL 106, 107, or 206. This course is a program of guided independent study in an area selected to meet student interests and needs. The course is repeatable up to 10 hours, provided the topics are different.
PHIL492 Capstone Course
Prerequisites: ENGL 106, 107, or 206; PHIL 100, 101, and junior or senior status Students are expected to narrow the focus of their studies to an area of interest that they have developed during their previous course work and/or through their experience in the field. Students will then complete a project related to this area of interest. Ordinarily, this project will be a philosophical paper worthy of publication, although it could be some other endeavor befitting a culminating university experience. All projects will be conceived and executed in consultation with and guidance by the course instructor and will require approval by the director of philosophy.