​​The Rieck Center for Habitat S​tudies

Rieck-Center-Logo-WEB.jpg

The Rieck Center for Habitat Studies is a 54-acre living laboratory focused on offering the community and university students environmental education.


Click the image above to see a beautiful fall view of the Rieck Center!

A wide range of natural habitats and scenery can be found throughout the property for study and leisurely activities:

  • Over two miles of hiking trails
  • Grasslands and prairies abundant with wildflowers in the summer
  • Wooded areas
  • Wetlands
  • Flood plains
  • A nearly two acre pond
  • Access to the Blanchard River
 

The large main building on the property offers:

Inside:
  • Classrooms and meeting rooms
  • Animal and plant displays for study
  • Bird monitoring room with one-way glass
Outside:
  • Large patio for grilling and enjoying nature
  • Hummingbird/butterfly garden and small adjacent frog pond

The wide range of natural habitats available provides the opportunity of hands-on experiences and the possibility for innovative use. With continuous help from volunteers, students, community members, and faculty of the University of Findlay, The Rieck Center for Habitat Studies is a productive and rewarding non-profit institution for learning and conservation of nature.  We all work together to ensure the Rieck Center stays a facility where diversity of habitats and wildlife can be studied, observed, and enjoyed.  As a team we design programs for hands-on learning experiences, and implement eco-projects to enhance wildlife habitat in Hancock County.


Directions to the Rieck Center

The center is located approximately 10 miles south of Findlay at 17311 Trail 166 Arlington, OH 45867.  Take State Route 37 East out of Findlay, cross OH-15 and continue on State Route 37 approximately two miles, Turn left onto Trail 166, the Rieck Center is approximately one mile down on the right.

History

The Rieck Center for Habitat Studies began as a beautiful gift. In 1972, approximately 54-acres of diverse habitat was graciously given to the Hancock County Humane Society by Anne Rieck. For more than 20-years the facility served as a shelter to homeless animals. The University of Findlay purchased the property from the Humane Society in 1992 after the shelter was moved into the city of Findlay. The property was renamed “the Rieck Center for Habitat Studies” that same year.

Questions?

For more information on the Rieck Center for Habitat Studies, including membership and facility usage information, please contact Ben Dolan, Ph.D., Biology Instructor and Director of the Rieck Center for Habitat Studies, at dolan@findlay.edu or visit rieckcenter.org.
You can also read about the Rieck Center in the UF Newsroom.

Learn more about UF's other environmental efforts.
/r/n